Serving God, Serving our Community

HLF Development Project

St Mary’s Church has recently completed the second phase of the re-ordering project, with generous support from the Heritage Lottery Fund. The exterior work comprised essential roof, masonry and window repairs to halt the ingress of rainwater: replacement of tiles on several roof slopes, relining of three lead valley gutters, overhaul of some rainwater downpipes including replacement of one larger hopper and…

Our Church building

St Mary’s is a Church of England Church which is a Grade ll* Listed Building of architectural and historic importance. It is built of brown Wealden sandstone and Bethersden marble with Caen stone dressings under a tiled roof. It sits in the centre of its churchyard. A church has existed in Frittenden for some 800 years and was mentioned in the ‘White…

The Medieval Church

Although much of the medieval church was swept away by the 1848 rebuild, some details were recorded or indeed retained by the architect of the new church, R.C. Hussey. 14th Century Paving Tiles Hussey carefully preserved some paving tiles from the old church. He incorporated them into vestry of the new church. They were, for the most part, designs of the Decorated…

The Organ – a brief history

The organ was originally installed in 1907 in the South Chancel (where the new kitchen and upper room are now).  The church logbook for 1 June 1907 says “The new organ, built by Messrs Peter Conacher Ltd for the sum of £510 was dedicated this day by the Lord Bishop of Croydon.  Mr Andrew Carnegie contributed the sum of £255.” Organ builders Peter Conacher…

The Bells

Frittenden has a long record of bell ringing with some notable records and personalities. In the 18th century St Mary’s had a peal of four bells.  These were recast into six bells, as noted by Edward Hasted in his history of Kent. Two bells were recast in 1803 and four in 1804 and the Church records show a payment in that year…

Edward Moore

Edward Moore was born in 1814, the son of the Rev. George Moore.  In addition to being a Prebend of Canterbury, George was Rector of Wrotham.  George was himself the son of John Moore, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1783 to 1805.  John Moore came from a relatively humble background, his own father, another George, having been a butcher in Gloucester. Edward Moore…

Rupert Inglis

Rupert Inglis was born in May 1863, the youngest son of Major-General Sir John Inglis, KCB, one of the heroes of the siege of Lucknow in 1857.  Rupert was educated at Rugby and was obviously an accomplished sportsman, being awarded his rugby colours in 1879 and 1880, and football colours in 1881, as well as playing cricket for the school.  In 1881…

Rectors and Patrons

Frittenden is a Rectory with records of its incumbents going back to 1279 when St Augustine’s was the patron of the parish. The difference between a Rector and a Vicar is largely historical.  A Rectory was a benefice in which the Tithe was paid to the incumbent.  The incumbent was known as the Rector and the Benefice house, where he lived, was…

Dissent and Frittenden’s Congregation

Frittenden’s Marian Martyrs Edmund Allin was the local miller and a literate man who led bible-reading classes for Protestants and it is likely that he was a local Protestant leader. This would have meant that the Rector, John Taylor, probably saw the miller as a local rival for political leadership of the village. Kent visitation records, from late 1557, report that John…